Cesare Lucchini

Why write about Cesare Luchini?  I came across his work first on Artsy when I did a search for Abstract Expressionism and asked myself  this question. “I wonder who I would like to emulate?  ”

Today my answer was-

Cesare Lucchini ( Bellinzona , 10 July 1941 [1] [2] ) is a painter SwissItalian .

What did I love.  The transparent softness and feel of his work.

I was drawn to this piece because of the space, something I want to learn to put into my work more.

quel che rimane, 2011
oil on canvas
194 x 180 cm

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See more of his work: 

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Wise Buys: 50 Women Artists Worth Watching

I have been finding a plethora of sites that feature women artists.  How wonderful is that.

Take the time to explore this article. It is worth the time and the read.

“Wouldn’t it be nice to think that a gender-delimited list is no longer relevant? It’s true that to be a practicing woman artist today is hardly the struggle it would have been in Mary Cassatt’s era…”

Read more Blouinartinfo

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Women – Brushes with Greatness

How wonderful to open a page about women artists in Wmagazine.

 

BRUSHES WITH GREATNESS

W visits the studios of eight women painters who are featured in The Museum of Modern Art’s new exhibit “The Forever Now”—and finds not 
a single wallflower in the bunch.

When pursuing further I found the show on MOMA

The Forever Now: Contemporary Painting in an Atemporal World presents paintings by 17 contemporary artists that reflect a singular peculiarly of our time in culture: these works are atemporal, a term coined by the science fiction writer and futurologist William Gibson. “Atemporality,” or timelessness, which is also evident in contemporary literature, music, and fashion, manifests itself in painting as an ahistorical cultural free-for-all, in which styles, techniques, and subjects from many different eras coexist, sometimes in a single work, making it difficult to identify the period in which an artwork was made.

John Harris

I love my morning time when I peruse through the internet and google my way to sheer joy. I began my search this morning looking at abstract oil painters and then meandered my way to a site that held the work of John Harris.   I was first drawn to his paintings of Yachts. John Harris is renowned for his brilliant yacht paintings, illustrating the excitement and unpredictable nature of the sea and I loved how they were more abstract.

John Harris is a British artist and illustrator, known for working in the science fiction genre. His paintings have been used on book covers for many authors..read more.

Then I was hooked and had to find his site. I spent an enjoyable 20minutes watching a video he created called the Secret History of the Earth. Worth watching.  I took the liberty to screen grab some sections that I found lovely.  Inspiring. Real. Moving.

This body of work, which is a reflection of Man’s relationship with the earth, is a deeply personal one for John.

He takes us from the genesis of the project right through to its fullest form of expression.

For more info:

facebook.com/Johnharrishiddensun
johnharrisart.com
alisoneldred.com/johnharris

 

Hiroshi Matsumoto

Apr. 1, 2013′ (2013) from the ‘9×9 painting’ series by Japanese abstract painter Hiroshi Matsumoto (b.1953). Oil on canvas, 9 x 9 cm. via the artist on Flickr.

Amazing if we take the time to look we can find inspiration everywhere from every corner of this earth. I loved how politely you are welcomed to his site. Welcome to www.hiroshimatsumoto.com

I agree with Hiroshi that you can get lost in exploring the paths of colour.  I particularily was drawn to this piece as I liked the soft colour combination. Lovely!

“I love oil paint, it’s texture, viscosity, slow-drying time and smell. I paint abstract. I never know what it is going to be until it’s complete. When I start to paint, I always put some colours on the canvas without thinking. My choice of colours is often accidental or intuitive. I try to catch the chance meeting of colour with composition. Sometimes I get lost, and then other times I find myself walking along a path that brings me back to where I belong. Abstract is for me a concrete way to share an inner sense, place and time with you directly and deeply.”  Artists Statement Hiroshi Matsumoto .

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Nicolas de Staël

I have been studying abstract painters and I have wanted to learn more about putting space and a visual resting place in my work. I was drawn to the work of Nicolas de Staël. I was saddened to learn that after a robust successful career he ended his own life.

I am mindful that we all must focus on that which is good and uplifting and not be thwarted by word or criticism of others.  Life is a gift and we must treasure the moments we find beauty.  Encourage painters. They are brave.

Nicolas de Staël was a painter known for his use of a thick impasto and his highly abstract landscape painting. He also worked with collage, illustration, and textiles.His painting style is characterized by a thick impasto showing traces of the brush and the palette knife, and by a division of the canvas into numerous zones of color.
De Staël’s painting career spans roughly 15 years (from 1940) and produced more than a thousand paintings. His work shows the influence of Gustave Courbet, Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso (especially Picasso in his Blue and Rose periods), Georges Braque, Fernand Léger and Chaim Soutine, as well as of the Dutch masters Rembrandt, Vermeer and Hercules Seghers. During the 1940s and beginning in representation (especially landscapes, but also still lifes, and portraits), de Staël moved further and further toward abstraction. Read More:

I was particularly drawn to this piece.  La Rout d’Ouzes 1954

stael-la-route

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Ingegerd Råman Doyenne

What a beautiful woman and what beautiful work. Simply elegant.

I learned a new word reading about her:

doy·enne
doiˈ(y)en/
noun
  1. a woman who is the most respected or prominent person in a particular field.

“Ingegerd Råman is the doyenne of Swedish Ceramics and Glass. For almost five decades this legendary designer has worked with Swedish Glassworks such as Johansfors, Skruf and Orrefors, and heightened the aesthetic experience of everyday objects in Swedish homes.  Her pared down, quietly elegant style with a focus on materiality and functionality, has won her many ardent followers and many awards. She has exhibited widely both at home and abroad and her designs are in the collections of major museums such as The National Museum in Stockholm, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Stedelijk in Amsterdam to name a few.doyenne of Swedish Ceramics and Glass. For almost five decades this legendary designer has worked with Swedish Glassworks such as Johansfors, Skruf and Orrefors, and heightened the aesthetic experience of everyday objects in Swedish homes.  Her pared down, quietly elegant style with a focus on materiality and functionality, has won her many ardent followers and many awards. She has exhibited widely both at home and abroad and her designs are in the collections of major museums such as The National Museum in Stockholm, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and the Stedelijk in Amsterdam to name a few.

Always curious, and not afraid to try something new, Ingegerd Råman continues to take on new challenges, and at the age of 73, shows absolutely no signs of slowing down. Read More

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